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  1. #11
    Moderator Pthorpe84's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian View Post
    I am going to tell you the opposite than PThorpe, but mine comes from experience. Nothing under a trailer stays coated. We are in Michigan and we put E-track in our smaller aluminum trailer and did what you did, put primer and painted metal under. Where wherever the metal touched the aluminum, the aluminum started to poweder away and the metal was rusting pretty bad. In the places the screws went through the e track into the aluminum, we had the same issue. the screws held nothing down anymore.

    The ONLY way that works is if you use stainless hardware and do not let your backing plates touch aluminum. Our new trailer has stailess hardware and aluminum backing plates. Lesson learned pretty quick. 2 years.
    You are correct. I was stating that each that there would have to be a barrier between the steel and aluminum to prevent the reaction. If you add salt or brine to the mix, that will accelerate the rate of corrosion. In particular it will attack the coating and absolutely destroy the it. Be careful with stainless hardware, as it will become the more noble metal and cause the steel to deteriorate quickly. You would need to use a rubber washer on both ends to assist in preventing the contact. Also the hole in which the bolt goes through is susceptible to the same interaction.

    Salt or Brine is the biggest issue in what your saying. Itís creates a pathway for the corrosion to take place. I honestly donít know how anything up north last for more than two years. That environment is tough.


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  3. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pthorpe84 View Post
    You are correct. I was stating that each that there would have to be a barrier between the steel and aluminum to prevent the reaction. If you add salt or brine to the mix, that will accelerate the rate of corrosion. In particular it will attack the coating and absolutely destroy the it. Be careful with stainless hardware, as it will become the more noble metal and cause the steel to deteriorate quickly. You would need to use a rubber washer on both ends to assist in preventing the contact. Also the hole in which the bolt goes through is susceptible to the same interaction.

    Salt or Brine is the biggest issue in what your saying. Itís creates a pathway for the corrosion to take place. I honestly donít know how anything up north last for more than two years. That environment is tough.


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    Actually, stuff up here lasts pretty well. You just have to be smart about items with poor wiring or grounds. It is just like a boat. Electrical flow can determine if corrosion happens faster or slower.

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  5. #13
    Moderator Pthorpe84's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian View Post
    Actually, stuff up here lasts pretty well. You just have to be smart about items with poor wiring or grounds. It is just like a boat. Electrical flow can determine if corrosion happens faster or slower.

    Sent from my XT1650 using Tapatalk
    I take pills to be this smart.

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  6. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pthorpe84 View Post
    Absolutely!

    You know down here we ainít exactly smart! Lmao*


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    You ass.

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  7. #15
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    Grabs popcorn!
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  8. #16
    Moderator Pthorpe84's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Ockert View Post
    Grabs popcorn!
    Naaa. No need. Itís all good. Brian is correct. Didnít mean to come across abrasive.

    Now I got to get back to my goats.


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  9. #17
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    This thread started some good discussion on corrosion.
    There are many different kinds of corrosion.
    Mentioned here is dissimilar corrosion.
    It will become more common as we place aluminum or other lightweight armor on our rigs.
    It will happen over time, and can be slow.
    Add salt water or brine from the roads like in Michigan, and it speeds up the process.
    Add an electrical current to it, and speed it up even more.

    Most of us are familiar with the typical surface rust from when we have scratched the paint off our armor.
    This is typical, and is usually very slow.

    Corrosion is the process of metal returning to its natural state.

    Most companies don't tell us how to stop the uncommon types of corrosion.
    The surface rust is easy, we just clean it up, prime it, and repaint it until the next rock.

    A little research will go a long way on stopping or slowing down some of the different types of corrosion.

    Todd
    President Sharetrails.org/BlueRibbon Coalition

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  11. #18
    Moderator Pthorpe84's Avatar
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    Yep. The powder on the aluminum that Brian mentioned is what amazes me. That is called white rust. Most folks donít think that non-ferrous metals can ďrustĒ but they can. Electrolysis is one of neatest forms of accelerated corrosion. All can happen with the above scenarios.

    But like yíall mentioned. Itís often very slow occurring, but one we should all keep in mind.


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  13. #19
    Jeep Owner Jegar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian View Post
    I am going to tell you the opposite than PThorpe, but mine comes from experience. Nothing under a trailer stays coated. We are in Michigan and we put E-track in our smaller aluminum trailer and did what you did, put primer and painted metal under. Where wherever the metal touched the aluminum, the aluminum started to poweder away and the metal was rusting pretty bad. In the places the screws went through the e track into the aluminum, we had the same issue. the screws held nothing down anymore.

    The ONLY way that works is if you use stainless hardware and do not let your backing plates touch aluminum. Our new trailer has stailess hardware and aluminum backing plates. Lesson learned pretty quick. 2 years.
    Good information, and experience goes a long way!

    I did wonder how much the salting played a roll, as mentioned by PThorpe below. But at the end of the day corrosion happens

    I'm going to have them pull off the plates and add rubber/silicone sheets between. Thanks!


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  14. #20
    Jeep Owner Jegar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Ockert View Post
    This thread started some good discussion on corrosion.
    There are many different kinds of corrosion.
    Mentioned here is dissimilar corrosion.
    It will become more common as we place aluminum or other lightweight armor on our rigs.
    It will happen over time, and can be slow.
    Add salt water or brine from the roads like in Michigan, and it speeds up the process.
    Add an electrical current to it, and speed it up even more.

    Most of us are familiar with the typical surface rust from when we have scratched the paint off our armor.
    This is typical, and is usually very slow.

    Corrosion is the process of metal returning to its natural state.

    Most companies don't tell us how to stop the uncommon types of corrosion.
    The surface rust is easy, we just clean it up, prime it, and repaint it until the next rock.

    A little research will go a long way on stopping or slowing down some of the different types of corrosion.

    Todd
    Please tell!


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